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Young people's rights

About this information

This information covers the general rights of children and young people. You can also find information about the rights of children and young people elsewhere in Adviceguide.

For information about employment, see Young people and employment.
For information about housing, see Young people and housing.
For information about family matters, see Young people and family.
For information about money and consumer rights, see Young people – money and consumer rights.
For information about benefits, see Young people and benefits.
For information about health and personal issues, see Young people – health and personal.
For information about the law and young people, see Young people and the law.
For information about transport, see Young people – travel and transport.

In this information, child means someone aged under 14 and young person means someone aged 14 or over but under 18. Parent means someone with parental responsibility.

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Proof of age

There are many schemes that provide cards to help prove your age. Many local authorities and local colleges run card schemes.

The national Proof of Age Standards Scheme (PASS) does not issue cards itself but sets standards and approves other schemes. If a card has the PASS hologram it means that the card issuer has met strict standards set by PASS and that the card can be relied on. Make sure that any proof of age card you get shows the PASS hologram. For more information and for details of approved schemes, go to the PASS website at: www.pass-scheme.org.uk.

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Discrimination

It's against the law to discriminate against anyone, including a child or young person, because of:

  • age
  • race, colour, nationality, ethnic or national origins
  • sex
  • disability
  • sexual orientation
  • religion or belief
  • gender reassignment
  • marriage or civil partnership
  • pregnancy or maternity leave.

Some of the places where you are protected from discrimination include schools and colleges, work, shops, clubs, pubs, hospitals and clinics and council services. You are protected against discrimination whether you are buying something or getting it for free.

In certain circumstances, there are exceptions to these rules which mean that discrimination is allowed.

If you have experienced discrimination, you may be able to take action against the organisation or person responsible.

For more information about discrimination, see our discrimination pages.

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Nationality and immigration

The law on nationality and immigration is complicated, and you should seek the help of an experienced adviser, for example, at a Citizens Advice Bureau. To search for details of your nearest CAB, including those that can give advice by email, click on nearest CAB.

For the addresses and information about organisations offering further help on immigration, see Help with immigration problems.

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Personal records

At any age, you have the right to see information kept about you, unless the person looking after the information considers you incapable of understanding the nature of the request you are making. If you are refused access to your records you can complain to the Information Commissioner.

As a parent you do not usually have the right to see information about your child kept on a computer record. This will only be allowed if:

  • the person looking after the information knows that the child has authorised the request; or
  • if the request is being made on behalf of a child or young person who is considered incapable of understanding the nature of the request.

For more information on access to personal records, see Using the law to protect your information or visit the Office of the Information Commissioner website at www.informationcommissioner.gov.uk.

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Punishment

Parents

As a parent, you have a legal right to smack your child. However, if the violence you use is severe enough to leave a mark, for example a scratch or a bruise, you can be prosecuted for assault, or the child can be taken into local authority care.

School

No teacher in a school is allowed to inflict corporal punishment on a pupil of any age. In Northern Ireland, no teacher in a grant-aided school is allowed to inflict corporal punishment on a pupil of any age.

The head teacher and teachers can use reasonable non-physical means to punish a pupil for unacceptable conduct or behaviour. Any punishment must be fair, reasonable and within the school’s policy. Examples of reasonable punishment are extra work during school hours or being told off.

A member of staff can use reasonable physical force to break up a fight between pupils or to stop pupils endangering themselves, other pupils or school property or to prevent a pupil from committing a criminal offence.

For more information, see Problems at school.

In care and other institutions

Corporal punishment must not be inflicted on any child or young person living in a children’s home, secure unit, foster home provided by the local authority or voluntary organisation, residential care home or young offender institution. If a child or young person lives in a private foster home, nursing or mental nursing home, or youth treatment centre, mild smacking is allowed as long as it does not leave a mark.

If you are concerned about the use of punishment, you should consult an experienced adviser, for example, at a Citizens Advice Bureau. To search for details of your nearest CAB, including those that can give advice by email, click on nearest CAB.

Registered childminders

In England and Wales a registered childminder is not allowed to smack a child in their care. In Northern Ireland, where smacking by a childminder is not banned, parents must have agreed that the childminder is allowed to use this sanction on their individual child and use of physical force must be a last resort.

If you are concerned about the use of punishment, you should seek the help of an experienced adviser, for example, a Citizens Advice Bureau. To search for details of your nearest CAB, including those that can give advice by email, click on nearest CAB.

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Religion

Parents have the right to choose whether their child follows a religion at home and school, and, if so, which one. However, a child or young person may choose their own religion if they have sufficient understanding. If a parent considers the child's chosen religion to be harmful, a court can be asked to intervene.

There is a general requirement on schools to provide religious education but it is possible for an individual child to be withdrawn from religious education.

For more information about religious education in schools, see Problems at school.

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Further help

Childline

England

Childline
Helpline: 0800 1111 (24 hour free advice line)
Website: www.childline.org.uk

Children and young people can ring or write, in confidence, if they need advice or are in trouble or danger. Childline can offer both support and practical help.

Wales

Childline Cymru/Wales
9th Floor
Alexandra House
Alexandra Road
Swansea
SA1 5ED
Tel: 0870 336 2935
Helpline: 0800 1111 (24 hour free advice line)
Fax: 0870 336 2936
Website: www.childline.org.uk/CymruWales.asp

Coram Children's Legal Centre (England only)

Riverside Office Centre
Century House North
North Station Road
Colchester
Essex
CO1 1RE

Child Law Advice Line: 0808 802 0008
Migrant Children's Project Advice Line: 020 7636 8505
Tel: 01206 714650
Fax: 01206 714660
Email: info@coramclc.org.uk
Website: www.childrenslegalcentre.com
Website for young people: www.lawstuff.org.uk

Coram Children's Legal Centre provides free legal advice and sometimes representation to children and parents on family, child and education law. The Centre has lots of useful factsheets on their website. The Centre also has a specialist helpline for migrant children, their families and advisers.

The Office of the Children's Commissioner for England

33 Greycoat Street
London
SW1P 2QF
Tel: 020 7783 8330
Fax: 020 7931 7544
Email: info.request@childrenscommissioner.gsi.gov.uk
Website: www.childrenscommissioner.gov.uk

The Office of the Children's Commissioner for England looks after the interests and acts as the independent voice of children and young people.

Children's Commissioner for Wales

Children's freephone

Tel: 0800 801 1000 (Mon-Fri 9.00am -5.00pm)
Textphone: 80800 and start the message with COM
E-mail: advice@childcomwales.org.uk

South Wales office

Oystermouth House
Phoenix Way
Llansamlet
Swansea SA7 9FS

Tel: 01792 765600
Fax:01792 765601
E-mail: post@childcomwales.org.uk
Website: www.childcom.org.uk

North Wales Office

Penrhos Manor
Oak Drive
Colwyn Bay
Conwy LL29 7YW
Tel: 01492 523333
Fax: 01492 523336

The Children's Commissioner for Wales can give children and young people living in Wales advice about their rights and welfare. The Commissioner can also help you make a complaint about your treatment if you are using the usual complaints procedure of an institution such as a school, care home or social services department. If your complaint is unsuccessful, the Commissioner may be able to carry out a separate investigation.

The Children's Commissioner also has powers to take action over 'whistleblowing'. 'Whistleblowing', in this case, is where an employee of an organisation for children and young people raises concerns that the organisation is acting against the interests of children in its care.

Children can use the special freephone and freetext numbers to contact the Commissioner, which won't show up on any phone bill. There's also a special email address for children to use. The service is bilingual and if you want to talk to someone in a language other than English or Welsh, they will try to make this possible.

The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC)

42 Curtain Road
London
EC2A 3NH
Tel: 020 7825 2500
Helpline: 0808 800 5000 (24 hour free advice line)
E-mail: help@nspcc.org.uk
Website: www.nspcc.org.uk

NSPCC offers advice, information and support.

The Northern Ireland Commissioner for Children and Young People (NICCY)

The Commissioner's role is to safeguard and promote the rights and best interests of children and young people.

Equality House
7-9 Shaftesbury Square
Belfast
BT2 7DP

Tel: 028 9031 1616
Fax: 028 9031 4545
E-mail: info@niccy.org
Website: www.niccy.org

Youth Action (Northern Ireland)

YouthAction Northern Ireland works with young people to support them as active and equal citizens whose voices are heard, respected and valued.

14 College Square North
Belfast
BT1 6AS

Tel: 028 9024 0551
Fax: 028 9024 0556
Website: www.youthaction.org

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